ISA ARFEN PRESENTS FIRST RESORT COLLECTION


The Italian-born, London-based designer fully embraced the idea of resort, designing a collection of bright, generously proportioned clothes for women on holiday in the Caribbean.

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FASHION WEEK
ISA ARFEN PRESENTS FIRST RESORT COLLECTION

The Italian-born, London-based designer fully embraced the idea of resort, designing a collection of bright, generously proportioned clothes for women on holiday in the Caribbean.
LAUREN INDVIK 13 HOURS AGO
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A look from Isa Arfen’s resort 2016 collection. Photo: Isa Arfen
A look from Isa Arfen’s resort 2016 collection. Photo: Isa Arfen
Serafina Sama, the founder of Isa Arfen, is one of the most exciting young designers working in London right now. An Italian who trained at Central Saint Martins and Chloé, she branched out on her own in 2011 with a small collection of cotton elastic-waist dresses that quickly caught on via word of mouth. In recent seasons, her clothes — colorful, voluminous, and typically devoid of pattern and embellishment — have been picked up by Opening Ceremony, Net-a-Porter and Avenue32, and will be carried by Nordstrom for the first time this fall.

The designer landed in New York on Tuesday to walk editors through her very first resort collection, which arrived by plane from London just the day before. Sama fully embraced the idea of resort, imagining clothes for glamorous, slightly eccentric Italian women on holiday in the Caribbean, who have taken their dressing inspiration from French magazines in the ’70s and ’80s and “gotten it just a bit wrong.” Thus the presence of garishly colored dresses, tops and skirts with exaggerated peplums and even more exaggerated sleeves, color-blocked in festive shades of red, yellow, pink, green and black.

Those were shown alongside what are becoming the label’s signatures: crisp culottes in silk faille, high-waisted trousers, relaxed trench coats in several of those aforementioned colors (namely bright red, hot pink and emerald green). New were the oversized jeweled buttons on white oxfords and a trench; the use of denim on a dress, jumpsuit and handful of separates; and a selection of mix-and-match monochrome pieces that combined black silk, textured gray wool and two sizes of black-and-white gingham. Because she focuses on separates, Sana says most of her customers tend to mix her pieces with those already in their wardrobes — including older Isa Arfen pieces. Sana says she’s careful to make sure her new designs can be easily paired with those she’s designed in the past.

With a design team of just four, Sana has her hands full, though she says she would one day like to explore bags and jewelry. Footwear, however, is not on the docket — Charlotte Olympia has designed the shoes for her last several collections and, Sana modestly asserted, those are better than anything she could do.

Credit: Fashionista.com

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FROM IDAHO TO YALE TO “GIRLS”: HOW JENN ROGIEN IS MAKING IT AS A COSTUME DESIGNER


The woman responsible for dressing the cast of “Girls” and “Orange Is the New Black” spoke about making a career in costume design at Fashionista’s June meetup.

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Charismatic, whip-smart, self-deprecating — those are ways one could describe Jenn Rogien, the Emmy-nominated costume designer behind hit TV series “Girls” (HBO) and “Orange Is the New Black” (Netflix). In just under a decade, Rogien has climbed the ranks from personal assistant to lead costume designer on not one, but two enormously popular shows, while embarking on collaborations with big-name apparel brands, including American Eagle and Sorrel, on the side.

During her school years, Rogien never thought of becoming a costume designer, she recalled at our “How to Make It in Fashion” meetup in New York on Wednesday evening. Though she was involved with her high school theater in Idaho, she entered Yale intending to get a degree in chemical engineering. As Rogien tells it, she spent so much time working on plays that she nearly ended up failing a couple of classes her second semester, and so she refocused on art and psychology, planning to embark on a career in fashion.

Rogien’s first job was in the buying department of Saks Fifth Avenue. She continued to do theater on the side, helping former classmates who were launching theater companies or working off Broadway, often sitting at a sewing machine until 4 in the morning — and showing up exhausted for work the next day. She decided to quit her job at Saks and began studying fashion design at Parsons. While there, she connected with a director looking for a [personal] assistant, though she still wasn’t thinking about a career in costume design at that point.

“You take the first in you can get,” Rogien said of her first PA role. “It’s so rare that the first job you get is the thing you most want to do.”

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There are several ways to break in to costume design — though, as those working in the field know, it can be years before you get to do any real design work. Although Rogien got her start in film, Broadway is a popular path, as is the theater scene in London, she said. There are differences in the work: Theatrical design tends to be more period-driven, with stronger colors and crazier prints, while TV and film call for subtler work suitable for a camera lens.

Mark Bridges, the BAFTA-winning costume designer for “The Artist,” was the first designer Rogien worked for, on the 2006 film “Fur: An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus,” starring Nicole Kidman. Rogien wasn’t, of course, doing any design work at that point — her sole task was to schedule fittings. Her next project was a live-action film with Disney, “Enchanted” (2007).

In the later ‘aughts, Rogien began to focus on TV, just as it was “emerging as a storytelling forum that was really unique,” she said. She worked as an assistant designer on a number of shows, including “Lipstick Jungle,” “Kings” and “The Good Wife” before landing her first lead costume design role for “Girls.”

“I had to write the most important cover letter of my life,” she recalled. “I kept it to five lines, then interviewed. I believe very strongly that you do not go into an interview for a design job without something to show. You can’t walk in with just your résumé.” There were four lead characters for “Girls,” but Rogien arrived at the meeting with design boards for 12, which she displayed on an iPad.

Talk to any costume designer about her career, and she’ll inevitably repeat the words “hard work” — and not just to describe her early years in the field. For Rogien, it’s not unusual to be on set as early as 4 a.m. for fittings, to run to a thrift or department store to pull a few things and to submit a round of looks for approval to a director, all in the course of a day. Shooting days can last as long as 12 hours, and there are no days off between episodes. “It’s rarely glamorous,” Rogien said. “I had one glamorous moment recently shooting at the Plaza, but more often I’m in the Salvation Army and a wall of clothing falls on me. That literally happened last week. It’s just one day per season you get to shop at Bergdorf.”

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In recent years, Rogien has found jobs through her network and her agent. “Film and television are incredibly networked businesses,” Rogien explained, noting that few jobs come through job boards. “There’s a PA program, and that’s really the first step. There are lots of teams that fall together organically and travel together [from project to project].” Rogien was working on “The Good Wife” when the “Girls” job opened up; a producer working on both shows recommended her.

The audience had, of course, many questions about Rogien’s strategy for dressing the cast of “Girls” and “Orange Is the New Black.” For “Girls,” Rogien said she shops where she thinks the characters would — for Hannah (played by Lena Dunham), that’s a lot of vintage and thrift shops mixed with Zara and Topshop. She describes the overall look of “Girls” as “realistic with a bit of lipgloss,” adding that she’s careful to steer away from trends because by the time a season airs, they may already be out the door. Personal details are key to dressing the cast of “Orange Is the New Black” — a lip color here, untucked socks there. The characters wear uniforms from a real prison uniform manufacturer, and Rogien says they aren’t altered unless an actor is especially petite.

No matter what the show, the script is Rogien’s most important tool. “A script [will tell you if a character] is snarky, poor, rich, works for this kind of company, drives this kind of car. My job is to filter that out and put together a look that will also tell you things.” Somewhat surprisingly, Rogien said she wants her costumes to be unnoticeable. “They shouldn’t be stealing spotlight from the characters. There are moments where the clothes are meant to steal the show… [But] none of [the shows I’m working on] are fashion shows,” a la “Gossip Girl” or “Sex and the City,” she explained.

Beyond costume design, Rogien also freelances as a stylist and has begun to collaborate with brands, including American Eagle and Sorrel, which she says is a great opportunity to connect more directly with fans. “I think costume designers have a unique approach of storytelling that can work really well with brands, to contextualize a product. It’s not just a pair of boots, it’s a pair of boots helping to tell a story of [the person who’s wearing them].”

When asked if there was a moment where she felt like she’d “made it,” Rogien recalled opening the New York Times Styles section and seeing a photo of the four lead characters of “Girls” in costume. “I never dreamed something [like] that would be in my life [when I was in] college hand-painting a Chinese parasol for a play,” she said. “You don’t anticipate those moments and those are the really gratifying ones.”

Photo: Meghan Uno/Fashionista
Culled from Fashionista.com

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NIGERIAN PROFESSOR PRODUCES ANTIVIRT, ANTI VIRAL DRUG THAT CURES HIV AIDS IN 2 MONTHS


Nigerian Professor Produces Antivirt, An Anti Viral Drug For Treating HIV AIDS. Despite doubts in some quarters about the authenticity of his claims, Professor Maduike Ezeibe of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Umudike (MOUAU), Abia State, has insisted that his recent therapy for the dreaded HIV and AIDS is real and effective.

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The discovery of the therapy, Ezeibe said, was a major scientific breakthrough in the search for a cure to the global pandemic.

He said after 19 years of hard work, he was able to discover the therapy and his research was eventually published in the British Journal of Medicine & Medical Research.

The Professor of Veterinary Medicine, who obtained his first degree in same discipline at the University of Nigeria Nsukka in 1986, Masters in Ruminant Medicine, and doctorate degree in Canine Medicine all in UNN, said he moved to MOUAU on leave of absence.

Speaking with Southern City News in his office, he said his research into the therapy known as ‘Antivirt’ (Anti-Viral Therapy), dated back to 1994 when he took the challenge to be part of the global solution to the HIV/AIDS scourge ravaging humanity.

Ezeibe said his work had been published by the American-based medical journal known as The Health.

He said he decided to publish his research work on the therapy so as to prove anyone who would doubt that a black man could develop HIV/AIDS cure, wrong.

He boasted that the experiment remained authentic and verifiable in any part of the world.

According to him, two essential minerals – aluminum silicate (kaolin) and magnesium silicate, used in the production of the therapy, have large deposits in Umuahia and parts of Abia State.

This, he said, would make the therapy cheaper and more affordable than the old anti-retroviral therapy.

He added that the therapy would take an average of two to three months to cure HIV/AIDS patient.

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NIKE’S LOGO WILL SOON BE ON EVERY NBA UNIFORM


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While there are still at least two games left in the NBA finals for the Golden State Warriors and Cleveland Cavaliers, a different kind of victory was announced on Thursday.

Nike has secured an eight-year global merchandising and marketing partnership with the NBA that will not only make Nike the official apparel provider for the association, but will also allow the brand to feature its trademark swoosh on every uniform. This is the first time an apparel partner has negotiated the right to feature its logo on the uniforms in the history of the NBA. According to ESPN, Nike paid $1 billion for the partnership.

Nike has partnered with the NBA in various ways since 1992, but Adidas currently produces the uniforms and will continue to do so until its contract expires in 2017. The German apparel company announced in March that it would not renegotiate the deal, deciding instead to focus on endorsing individual players — players who must now wear Nike logos on the court.

Uniforms are already a big part of Nike’s business. It signed an apparel deal with the NFL in 2012 and with USA Basketball, which oversees national teams for competitions like the Olympics, in 2006.

Nike’s new NBA uniforms will make their debut in the 2017-2018 season.

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AS ZARA ENLARGED ITS FLAGSHIPS THIS SPRING, PARENT COMPANY INDITEX MADE OVER HALF A BILLION DOLLARS


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Par for the fast fashion course, the first quarter of the fiscal year was all about relentless growth for Zara’s parent company, Inditex. Among the ways in which the company got bigger and badder between Feb. 1 and April 30: opening stores in 27 markets, enlarging existing Zara flagships in cities like Beijing and Copenhagen, and watching its income soar 28 percent to €521 million (about $589 million), well above what analysts expected.

For comparison, H&M reported profits of about $423 million in late March for the quarter running from December through February.

Across all of Inditex’s brands — which also include Massimo Dutti, Bershka, Zara Home and Stradivarius — sales for the period hit nearly €4.4 billion ($4.9 billion). Zara accounted for about two-thirds of that sum, execs said on Wednesday.

Inditex plans to open stores in 50 to 60 markets over the course of the year, adding to its fleet of more than 2,000 stores in 88 countries. It’s a costly endeavor: Roughly 85 percent of capital expenditures go toward store refurbishments and openings.

For now, at least, it seems to be a winning plan. And coming just a few days after Zara’s former U.S. general counsel filed a discrimination lawsuit against the company — he claims he was derided for being Jewish, American and gay, and witnessed other instances of racism — a sizable boost in profits might be just what Inditex needs to placate the financial community.

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